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Day Two
18 September 2019

Day two of PlanTech will focus on the subject of planning for the future of mobility, with key topic areas including people, places, infrastructure and the business environment. Our speakers will provide insight from their own experience of having to address these challenges which will be of great value to senior policymakers, planners and decision-makers across the UK.

Day Two
18 September 2019

More data-driven and digitally-enabled transport planning has the potential to radically improve the transport system and pave the way for future technology such as driverless cars and drones.

The UK is at the forefront of transport innovation. Hear how the country’s biggest transport authority, Transport for London, is planning for the future from both an infrastructure and service delivery perspective, in what is already arguably the most integrated transport system in the world.

In this session we will hear from:

  • Ben Plowden, Senior Director, Transport for London (TfL)

The rise of new mobility services is changing how we chose, pay for and use transport. The future of transportation is more customer centric. The silos in which many modes have historically operated are beginning to be broken down. New disruptors with the ability to create competitive business models from integrating transport options are beginning to thrive. The Rail Sector Deal 2018 states ‘the effect of this integrated approach to travel will shift the dial away from personally owned cars… and create new digital economies that boost productivity for both new and traditional businesses’.

Of course, this future depends on the complex relationships of hundreds of thousands of UK transport companies to form new business ecosystems. But how do we plan for these new mobility services and how will their growth impact how we plan our cities and infrastructure in the future?

In this session we will hear from:

Living labs offer the opportunities for organisations and authorities to keep pace with the fast-moving world of technological change. As first envisaged by MIT, a living lab is ‘a research methodology for sensing, prototyping, validating and refining complex solutions in multiple and evolving real-life contexts.’

From a Connected Places Catapult perspective, living labs offer a great opportunity to foster innovation, enabling the research industry, startups and public sector require to gain insight into their respective real-world roles. Living labs can help evolve urban design and placemaking, with space that successfully accommodates the needs of connected and automated vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists in a safe, balanced and coherent way.

The rise of the living lab mirrors the wider trends of IoT, smart cities and digitisation which challenge long-established norms around such things as work patterns, land use, logistics and with it the operations and servicing of buildings and transport systems. Understanding and testing the many and varied ways in which these systems interact can be done through a living lab enabling agile, fail fast learning,extensive testing and incremental development to determine whether an idea has value.

In this session we will hear from:

Accessibility is increasingly recognised as a key element of a high-quality, efficient and sustainable transport system. All of us as users benefit from easier access to buses, planes, trains, trams, ships etc. It is important to remember that the majority of journeys involve using more than one mode of transport. Therefore, the overall objective of creating accessible transport services should be to develop a seamless system for all.

In this session we will hear from:

The government is committed to investing significant amounts over the coming years in upgrading and expanding the UK’s transport infrastructure. Key examples of this include HS2 and the £25 billion road investment through Highways England’s RIS2 plans. From a policy perspective, transport is seen as key in supporting the country’s economy and enabling the growth of new housing and employment opportunities.

However, within the current planning horizon, there is likely to be unprecedented change in transport technologies currently in use, reflecting our commitment to de-carbonisation, the advent of new mobility solutions and increasing automation, alongside social and demographic change. All of these create challenges when planning for our future.

Our speakers will provide their own view on how we can use new technologies, data and taking different viewpoints can allow us to plan for a prosperous future.

In this session we will hear from: